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“But when Isaac’s servants dug in the valley and found there a well of flowing water, the herdsmen of Gerar quarreled with the herdsmen of Isaac, saying, “The water is ours!” So he named the well Esek, because they contended with him.  Then they dug another well, and they quarreled over it too, so he named it Sitnah.  He moved away from there and dug another well, and they did not quarrel over it; so he named it Rehoboth, for he said, “At last the LORD has made room for us, and we will be fruitful in the land.””  Gen. 26:19-22

This is one of many narrative portions of scripture that if we merely read at face value, we only glean historical, seemingly anecdotal information about the life is Isaac.  We must always ask ourselves what lesson we can learn from the text and how we can apply it to our own lives.

Consider how frustrated Isaac likely already was at the fact that the Philistines stopped up his father’s wells.  Abimelech asked him to leave Gerar proper, and now while trying to make his own space, he and his servants go through all the effort to dig a well, only to have the Philistines commandeer it.  And then it happens a second time!

The land of Canaan was given to Abraham and Isaac by God, and yet Isaac can’t seem to claim any of it for himself.  Likewise it was probably frustrating for Abraham that, although the land was his in the eyes of God, he had to buy a cave to bury Sarah, including a field he didn’t want, for an exorbitant price!

What we must glean from this part of scripture is that at times, life will seem unfair; we will be wronged on occasion, and often our efforts will seem to be in vain.  Isaac shows us great character through the ordeal however, most notably his being slow to anger, and his perseverance.

We should take note that many of the hurdles Isaac faces in this story are extremely similar to those of Abraham, up to and including issues over wells with Abimelech.  God may at times bring us through similar ordeals to see if we handle them differently and with better character than our fathers, or than we ourselves have in the past.

This is what the story of Isaac is about; Improving our reactions to life’s challenges.  This becomes clear when, after all this strife with the Philistines in Gerar, Abimelech eventually comes to make a covenant with Isaac.  It is true this was done with Abraham as well, however what is important to note is the tone of each of these covenants:

Abraham hears Abimelech out, then decides to complain about the issues with the wells,   stubbornly insists that Abimelech recognize that the wells were his, then they part ways. (Gen. 21:22-32).  It is as if he agrees to peace, but he is not really at peace about it.

Contrast this with Isaac, who had even more trouble over the wells, and in addition probably felt his father’s reputation slighted over stopping the old wells up (v. 15).  When Abimelech and his entourage show up to make a peace covenant with Isaac, there is a distinct feeling of goodwill that was lacking from the covenant with Abraham.  Not only does Isaac not complain about his treatment – he makes them a feast (a custom Abraham decided to skip) and we are told in v. 31 that Abimelech left “in peace”, something also missing from the covenant with Abraham.

This story teaches us about spiritual maturity, personal growth and improvement in our relationships.  The blessing from this?  Consider v. 32:

 “Now it came about on the same day, that Isaac’s servants came in and told him     about the well which they had dug, and said to him, “We have found water.”

Life indeed.

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“At that time Abimelech and Phicol the commander of his forces said to Abraham, “God is with you in everything you do.  Now swear to me here before God that you will not deal falsely with me or my children or my descendants. Show to me and the country where you are living as an alien the same kindness I have shown to you.”  Abraham said, “I swear it.”  Then Abraham complained to Abimelech about a well of water that Abimelech’s servants had seized.  But Abimelech said, “I don’t know who has done this. You did not tell me, and I heard about it only today.”  So Abraham brought sheep and cattle and gave them to Abimelech, and the two men made a treaty. Abraham set apart seven ewe lambs from the flock, and Abimelech asked Abraham, “What is the meaning of these seven ewe lambs you have set apart by themselves?”  He replied, “Accept these seven lambs from my hand as a witness that I dug this well.”  So that place was called Beersheba, because the two men swore an oath there.” Gen. 21:22-31

Certainly Abimelech had no small impression of Abraham (and his God) in Genesis 20 when God threatened Abimelech’s life pending Abraham’s prayers (Gen. 20:7). And so Abimilech wanted a covenant with Abraham because ‘God was with Abraham’ (rabbi Sforno).  Even though Abimelech was a king, he had a healthy fear and respect for Abraham.  This is not the only time in the scriptures a man of God will hold a conversation with a king and have his words heeded though the man has no actual authority.  This shows us the power and influence of God in Abraham’s life.

Abimelech is coming to Abraham to make a pact; thus Abraham has the upper hand in negotiations – he can refuse to make the pact, or add stipulations to it.  Abimelech starts off by stating how Abraham was treated well in his land, when in fact there was at least one incident where he was not.  Unlike God, earthly kings simply cannot know all the happenings in their land – even things done by his own servants.

Abraham chooses to offer sheep to Abimelech to prove that the well that was seized was in fact his.  Abraham never told Abimelech about the well he dug that was taken from him when it happened.  Since Abraham did not, he now is able to get his well back.  If he had raised the issue prior, we cannot be sure how Abimelech would have reacted, for it has been some years since their encounter over Sarah (Isaac had since been born and was weaned.)

This shows us there is a time to hold our tongues from speaking against those whom we have grievances; The time may come when settlement may come about on our terms and in our favor.  God knows all and certainly has the ability to repay.

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