“But when Isaac’s servants dug in the valley and found there a well of flowing water, the herdsmen of Gerar quarreled with the herdsmen of Isaac, saying, “The water is ours!” So he named the well Esek, because they contended with him.  Then they dug another well, and they quarreled over it too, so he named it Sitnah.  He moved away from there and dug another well, and they did not quarrel over it; so he named it Rehoboth, for he said, “At last the LORD has made room for us, and we will be fruitful in the land.””  Gen. 26:19-22

This is one of many narrative portions of scripture that if we merely read at face value, we only glean historical, seemingly anecdotal information about the life is Isaac.  We must always ask ourselves what lesson we can learn from the text and how we can apply it to our own lives.

Consider how frustrated Isaac likely already was at the fact that the Philistines stopped up his father’s wells.  Abimelech asked him to leave Gerar proper, and now while trying to make his own space, he and his servants go through all the effort to dig a well, only to have the Philistines commandeer it.  And then it happens a second time!

The land of Canaan was given to Abraham and Isaac by God, and yet Isaac can’t seem to claim any of it for himself.  Likewise it was probably frustrating for Abraham that, although the land was his in the eyes of God, he had to buy a cave to bury Sarah, including a field he didn’t want, for an exorbitant price!

What we must glean from this part of scripture is that at times, life will seem unfair; we will be wronged on occasion, and often our efforts will seem to be in vain.  Isaac shows us great character through the ordeal however, most notably his being slow to anger, and his perseverance.

We should take note that many of the hurdles Isaac faces in this story are extremely similar to those of Abraham, up to and including issues over wells with Abimelech.  God may at times bring us through similar ordeals to see if we handle them differently and with better character than our fathers, or than we ourselves have in the past.

This is what the story of Isaac is about; Improving our reactions to life’s challenges.  This becomes clear when, after all this strife with the Philistines in Gerar, Abimelech eventually comes to make a covenant with Isaac.  It is true this was done with Abraham as well, however what is important to note is the tone of each of these covenants:

Abraham hears Abimelech out, then decides to complain about the issues with the wells,   stubbornly insists that Abimelech recognize that the wells were his, then they part ways. (Gen. 21:22-32).  It is as if he agrees to peace, but he is not really at peace about it.

Contrast this with Isaac, who had even more trouble over the wells, and in addition probably felt his father’s reputation slighted over stopping the old wells up (v. 15).  When Abimelech and his entourage show up to make a peace covenant with Isaac, there is a distinct feeling of goodwill that was lacking from the covenant with Abraham.  Not only does Isaac not complain about his treatment – he makes them a feast (a custom Abraham decided to skip) and we are told in v. 31 that Abimelech left “in peace”, something also missing from the covenant with Abraham.

This story teaches us about spiritual maturity, personal growth and improvement in our relationships.  The blessing from this?  Consider v. 32:

 “Now it came about on the same day, that Isaac’s servants came in and told him     about the well which they had dug, and said to him, “We have found water.”

Life indeed.

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